Marsha Haller, MD, Medical Acupuncture

About Marsha Haller, MD

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About Marsha Haller, MD

 

Dr Haller was born in Brooklyn New York.  She graduated form Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, NY in 1980, and did her residency training at San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF in Psychiatry and Family Medicine.  She returned to New York in 1984 to teach in, and eventually direct the Family Medicine Residency Program at Lutheran Medial Center in Brooklyn, NY.  She also completed a fellowship in Urban Family Health, and the Geriatric Teaching Program at Mt Sinai Hospital.  Dr. Haller was board certified in Geriatric Medicine in 1990.  During her academic career, she developed courses on cross-cultural and psychosocial aspects of family medicine, and geriatric psychopharmacology.

She returned to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1990, joining Alameda Family Physicians, where for 12 years she treated men, women and children across the full spectrum of health and illness.  During this time, she developed particular interest in chronic myofascial pain, and deepened her commitment to a more holistic approach to health and healing.  In 1999, Dr Haller began physician-specific acupuncture training through the TCM oriented Academy of Pain Research and later the UCLA/Helms course in Medical Acupuncture.  In 2004 she became a Diplomate of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture.  For the last 15 years, her Berkeley practice has been devoted to medical acupuncture and related techniques.  She is committed to fostering  lifestyle changes that lead to better individual and global health. 

Dr Haller’s other interests include painting, collage, many other forms of art, gardening, yoga, cooking and hiking.  She also works for the San Francisco Department of Public Health at a clinic in the Tenderloin doing urgent care.  She lives in Berkeley with her partner Murray, and other members of their multi-generational family and animals.

What is Medical Acupuncture and how does it differ from other forms of acupuncture?

Dr. Haller: Remarks on my journey

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